Stacks of the Cuba Archives

Synagogue Records (A–C)

A–C | D–P | R–T

A

Adas Yeshurun Synagogue. Augusta, Georgia. Records, 1922–1985.
Mss 163

Size: .4 linear feet.

Content: Adas Yeshurun Synagogue Records consist primarily of minutes, some financial records, and program books relating to the varied activities and projects of this Orthodox synagogue. The Adas Yeshurun Synagogue is the oldest and first congregation in Augusta, Georgia.

Significance: Adas Yeshurun Synagogue was founded in 1889 when five Orthodox Jewish families formed a minyan as the basis for the congregation.

In 1890, the men who kept the Sabbath felt they could not participate in minyan with men whose businesses were open on that holy day, so they formed another minyan. In 1891, a third minyan was formed. In 1891, the three minyans merged.

On October 9, 1891, H. C. Rooney, Judge of the Superior Court of Richmond County, Georgia, granted a corporate charter to Morris Steinberg, Bernard Holatsky, Morris Coffsky, Isadore Fromberg, S. Aaron Bulkovstein, Lesser Steinberg, Benjamin Grunglos, Abram Shapiro, Sam Steinberg, Aaron Steinberg, Solomon Wigodsky, and Mandel Sawilowsky, to be incorporated under the name Society Adash Yershurien. Significantly, the petition for a charter did not give religious purposes as a reason for corporation, but “… for mutual benefit and pleasure and to assist in charitable work.”

In 1902, the congregation split again because some of the members felt there was a need for another shochet. After three or four years, the two congregations came together again. In 1909, Mrs. Henry Levkoff organized the Daughters of Israel. Today it functions as the Sisterhood of the Synagogue. By 1945, the congregation had outgrown their synagogue; Rabbi Goldberger enlisted William Estroff to take leadership in the building of a new synagogue. Due to the untimely deaths of William Estroff and Rabbi Goldberger, the ground of the new synagogue was not broken until 1953.

Ahavath Achim Congregation. Atlanta, Georgia. Records, 1887-1988.
Mss 21

Walter Bunzl (front) with friends, dressed up for Purim, Vienna, Austria, 1921.

Congregation Ahavath Achim at its
former location on Gilmer Street.

Size: 12 linear feet.

Content: Minutes, annual reports, bulletins, calendars, correspondence, membership records, financial records, and general administrative files.

Significance: Ahavath Achim Congregation was organized in 1886 as Congregation Ahawas Acim (Brotherly Love) and is Atlanta’s second oldest Jewish congregation. Organized by Jews of Eastern European descent, the congregation’s founding members felt uncomfortable in the established Hebrew Benevolent Congregation (The Temple), comprised primarily of Jews from Germany who, by the late 1800s, had begun to liberalize their Orthodox doctrine. By 1952, Ahavath Achim joined the Conservative movement, with the most noticeable shift from Orthodoxy being the gradual change to mixed seating. Today, Ahavath Achim Congregation is the largest Conservative congregation in Atlanta.

Ahavath Achim Congregation. Atlanta, Georgia. Records, 19201921.
(souvenir program of the dedication of the Washington Street building, 19201921 and a constitution and by-laws booklet 1936)

Ahavath Achim Sisterhood. Records, 1935–1983.
Mss 14

Size: 2.4 linear feet.

Content: Presidents notebook, 1935–1937, telegrams, newspaper clippings, holiday workshop material, programs, invitation, souvenir journals, correspondence, speeches, president's reports, constitution and by-laws, and synagogue bulletins.

Significance: Founded in 1920, this organization is one of the oldest extant women's organizations in Atlanta. The researcher will be able to study the development of the congregation through the use of Sisterhood records, as well as through the nearly complete series of congregational bulletins. The researcher interested in women's history and the role that Jewish women have played in the development of synagogue life as well as community life will also find this collection of special interest.

 

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B

B'nai Israel Synagogue. Thomasville, Georgia. Records, 1930-1974.
Mss 81

Size: .2 linear feet.

Content: Primarily records of the Sisterhood of the Congregation including minutes, 1930-1972.

Significance: This still extant synagogue in Thomasville, Georgia was established in 1885.

C

Congregation Agudath Israel. Montgomery, Alabama. Records, 1929.
Coupon bond

Congregation Anshi S'fard. Atlanta, Georgia. Records, undated.
(membership list)

Congregation Bet Haverim. Atlanta, Georgia.  Records, 2004-2005.
(newsletters and holiday publications of the congregation)

Congregation Beth El. Atlanta, Georgia. Records, 1954-1961.
Mss 58

Size: .2 linear feet.

Content: Certificate, scrapbook, song sheet, and newsletter.

Significance: Congregation Beth El was a short-lived Conservative synagogue established in 1954.

Congregation Beth Hamedrash Hagodel Anshi S'fard. Atlanta, Georgia. Records, 1939-1960.
Mss 8

Size: .2 linear feet.

Content: Constitution, minutes, annual report, and records, 1939-1959, of the Atlanta Co-operative Credit Association established to provide financial assistance to members of this congregation.

Significance: Founded in 1913 it is Atlanta's oldest, still extant Orthodox congregation.

Congregation Beth Jacob. Records, 1993.
(history of congregation)

Congregation B'nai Torah. Records, 1984.
(program from groundbreaking ceremony)

 

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Rabbi Nathan Katz (on right), longtime spiritual leader of Congregation Anshi S'fard poses with Rabbi Binyomin Friedman, Atlanta, Georgia, c.1985.

Rabbi Nathan Katz (on right), longtime spiritual leader of Congregation Anshi S'fard, poses with Rabbi Binyomin Friedman, Atlanta, Georgia, c.1985.

 

Congregation Children of Israel. Augusta, Georgia. Records, 1919-2005.
Mss 153

Size: 9 linear feet.

Content: The records of Congregation Children of Israel consist of minutes, correspondence, financial and legal records and general administrative files. Of special interest is the Sunday School scrapbook containing photographs dating back to the 1860s.

Significance: Congregation Children of Israel - Augusta, Georgia was established in 1846. The then small membership of approximately 20 people, felt the need to form a religious school. This was the core of what later became Congregation B'nai Israel and later Children of Israel in 1846. In 1879 the Hebrew Ladies Aid Society was founded and in 1919, the National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods was created and was joined by the Society. The Temple brotherhood was established in the 1920s. Congregation Children of Israel held its 100th anniversary in 1945.

Congregation Mickve Israel. Savannah, Georgia.  Records, c.1960.
(postcards of the interior and exterior of the building)

Congregation Shearith Israel. Atlanta, Georgia. Records, 1938-1990.
Mss 75

Size: 8 linear feet.

Content: Primarily minutes, 1947-1974, bulletins, 1959-1990, and correspondence, 1940-1978.

Significance: Congregation Shearith Israel was founded in 1904 by a segment of Atlanta's East European Jewish community. Congregation Shearith Israel's first rabbi, Zvi Elchanan Gutterman, stayed with the congregation from 1904-1906. In 1907, the members invited Rabbi Tobias Geffen to serve the congregation as its spiritual leader. He would remain in that position until his death in 1970. Under Geffen's leadership, the congregation grew as an orthodox congregation that upheld Old World values and rites.

Congregation Shearith Israel. Atlanta, Georgia. Records, undated.
(program from Museum of Judaica)

Congregation Or Ve Shalom. Atlanta, Georgia. Records, 1915-1973.
Mss 57

Size: .8 linear feet.

Content: Financial records, and Hebrew school attendance and grade books.

Significance: Congregation Or Ve Shalom was founded in 1914 when Congregation Ahavat Shalom and Congregation Or Hahayim merged. Its membership was originally comprised of immigrants to Atlanta from Turkey and the Isle of Rhodes.

Congregation Shearith Israel. Atlanta, Georgia. Records, 1938-1990.
Mss 75

Size: 8 linear feet.

Content: Primarily minutes, 1947-1974, bulletins, 1959-1990, and correspondence, 1940-1978.

Significance: Congregation Shearith Israel was founded in 1904 by a segment of Atlanta's East European Jewish community. Congregation Shearith Israel's first rabbi, Zvi Elchanan Gutterman, stayed with the congregation from 1904-1906. In 1907, the members invited Rabbi Tobias Geffen to serve the congregation as its spiritual leader. He would remain in that position until his death in 1970. Under Geffen's leadership, the congregation grew as an orthodox congregation that upheld Old World values and rites.

 

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Purim play, Congregation Children of Israel, Augusta.

Purim play, Congregation Children of Israel, Augusta.